Dr. Yoko Hsueh Shirai


About Dr. Yoko Hsueh Shirai

Dr. Yoko Hsueh Shirai received her PhD in Japanese Art from UCLA, and enjoys living and teaching Asian art in Los Angeles. She has taught at UCLA, Otis College of Art & Design, USC, and Occidental College. She remains grateful to Japan Foundation for awarding her a doctoral fellowship to study Buddhist statuary excavated from the ruins of temples dating to the 7th and 8th centuries C.E., and especially her host institution, Nara kenritsu Kashihara Kokogaku Kenkyujo (Nara prefectural Archaeological Institute of Kashihara). What she learned from that experience, in addition to the contacts she made, serve as the basis of her publications on Early Japan.


Detail, Haniwa: Tomb Sculpture of a Seated Warrior, Japan, late Tumulus period, c. 500-600 C.E., coil-built eathenware with applied decoration, 31 x 14 3/8 x 15 inches / 78.7 x 36.5 x 38.1 cm (Los Angeles County Museum of Art)
These expressive funerary objects evolved from simple clay cylinders into animal, human, and building forms.

A-Level: Haniwa Warrior


Detail, Haniwa: Tomb Sculpture of a Seated Warrior, Japan, late Tumulus period, c. 500-600 C.E., coil-built eathenware with applied decoration, 31 x 14 3/8 x 15 inches / 78.7 x 36.5 x 38.1 cm (Los Angeles County Museum of Art)
These expressive funerary objects evolved from simple clay cylinders into animal, human, and building forms.

Haniwa Warrior