At The Met, New York City

We live in New York, so we are lucky to be able to visit this amazing institution often. It's one of the great encyclopedic museums (meaning it collects and exhibits works from all time and from around the globe). And if you can't get there in person, virtually explore the museum with us as your guide.

Some background

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Link to The Met's website

<em>Standing Male Worshipper</em> (Tell Asmar)
Standing Male Worshipper (Tell Asmar)

One of a group buried in a temple almost 5,000 years ago, this statue’s job was to worship Abu—forever.

Mirror with game board design and animals of the four directions
Mirror with game board design and animals of the four directions

This ancient bronze mirror features elaborate designs representing immortality and the cosmos.

Jar (Hu)
Jar (Hu)

Painted spirals recall the crests of waves on this 4,500-year-old jar.

Artist, scribe, and poet: Abu Zayd and 12th-century Iranian ceramics
Artist, scribe, and poet: Abu Zayd and 12th-century Iranian ceramics

Poetry is central to this bowl—Persian and Arabic poems encircle the vessel on both its exterior and interior.

Tomb model of a watchtower
Tomb model of a watchtower

Buried in an Eastern Han tomb, this watchtower model represents the ideal world of the tomb occupant's afterlife in miniature.

A Mamluk candlestick base
A Mamluk candlestick base

Mamluk sultan al-Nasir Muhammad's candlestick base exemplifies a new visual language of power that emerged in 14th-century Egypt and Syria.

Joachim Michael Salecker, Cup with cover with Hebrew inscriptions
Joachim Michael Salecker, Cup with cover with Hebrew inscriptions

This ornamented silver cup tells a story about a prominent Jewish man close to rulers and European courts at a time when Jewish life was restricted

In Full Color, Ancient Sculpture Reimagined
In Full Color, Ancient Sculpture Reimagined

Contrary to the white marble of the ancient Mediterranean we see today, the ancient Greeks and Romans painted their statues in vibrant colors

Jacques-Louis David, <em>The Death of Socrates</em>
Jacques-Louis David, The Death of Socrates

What is worth dying for? David draws comparisons between ancient Roman philosopher Socrates and the French Revolution

Married Woman’s Apron (<em>itjogolo</em> or <em>ijogolo</em>), Ndebele peoples
Married Woman’s Apron (itjogolo or ijogolo), Ndebele peoples

These decorated aprons were gifts from the groom’s family to his wife, and signified her new role in society.

Han Gan, <em>Night-Shining White</em>
Han Gan, Night-Shining White

Han’s Night-Shining White exemplifies the expressive power of the line, the backbone of Chinese painting.

Ottoman prayer carpet with triple-arch design
Ottoman prayer carpet with triple-arch design

This Muslim prayer carpet shares striking visual similarities to a Jewish carpet meant to cover the Torah ark.