In the National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City

Visiting the National Museum of Anthropology? Make sure to see these works.

Some background

videos + essays

We're adding new content all the time!

Offering #4, La Venta
Offering #4, La Venta

These seventeen baby-faced figures may have represented a priestly ritual, a sacrifice, or a procession.

Yaxchilán—Lintels 24 and 25 from Structure 23 and structures 33 and 40
Yaxchilán—Lintels 24 and 25 from Structure 23 and structures 33 and 40

Over a hundred lintel relief sculptures depicting scenes from royal life survive from Yaxchilán.

<em>The Sun Stone</em> (or <em>The Calendar Stone)</em> (Aztec)
The Sun Stone (or The Calendar Stone) (Aztec)

So ubiquitous that it has been used on currency, this unfinished stone records Aztec history and a future prophecy.

<em>Coatlicue</em>
Coatlicue

This goddess has clawed feet, and wears a necklace of body parts and the snake-skirt from which she takes her name.

Classic Maya portrait stelae
Classic Maya portrait stelae

Large stone sculptures was the principal medium for presenting Maya political and religious messages to the public.

Tlatilco Figurines
Tlatilco Figurines

Playful figurines, including plump pigs and canine companions, represent scenes of daily life and nature.