In the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City

We live in New York, so we are lucky to be able to visit this amazing institution often. It's one of the great encyclopedic museums (meaning it collects and exhibits works from all time and from around the globe).

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The Renaissance in Spain, The Morata Master
The Renaissance in Spain, The Morata Master

Get to know fifteenth-century Aragonese painting, which draws on Italian and Northern Renaissance influences.

Decoding art: Dürer’s <em>Melencolia I</em>
Decoding art: Dürer’s Melencolia I

Explore Dürer's masterful "psychological self-portrait" and the hidden meanings of the various objects in it.

The conservator’s eye: Taddeo Gaddi, Saint Julian
The conservator’s eye: Taddeo Gaddi, Saint Julian

Monks and nuns removed candle soot from this painting using urine and lye, but its gold background never tarnished.

Rome’s history in four faces at The Met
Rome’s history in four faces at The Met

Realism, ideal beauty, and military might—explore the evolution of Roman portraits and political imagery.

Water-Moon Avalokiteśvara
Water-Moon Avalokiteśvara

This exquisite example of a Goryeo Buddhist painting depicts the bodhisattva on his mountain-island abode.

Trebonianus Gallus — emperor or athlete? Rethinking a modern attribution
Trebonianus Gallus — emperor or athlete? Rethinking a modern attribution

In the chaos of the 3rd century, can we be sure about the identification of this statue?

<em>Bamboo in the Four Seasons</em>: painting and poetry in Japan
Bamboo in the Four Seasons: painting and poetry in Japan

Originally a sliding wall, these golden panels use bamboo, a Chinese motif, to illustrate a Japanese poetic trope.

Jizō Bosatsu
Jizō Bosatsu

This boyish bodhisattva reminds us that through humble bearing, we can spiritually blossom—like a lotus flower.

Palmyra: the modern destruction of an ancient city
Palmyra: the modern destruction of an ancient city

Terrorists overran Palmyra twice despite international cries for protection, sowing irreversible destruction.

Inverse-Face Beaker
Inverse-Face Beaker

Feline fangs, rather than human teeth, suggest that this figure is either supernatural or in contact with deities.

Francis Picabia, <em>Ideal</em>
Francis Picabia, Ideal

Though Picabia borrows from the popular machine aesthetic, nothing about his apparatus is functional.

Lost History: the terracotta sculpture of Djenne Djenno
Lost History: the terracotta sculpture of Djenne Djenno

Are these little-understood figures representations of diseased people, or an attempt to ward off illness?