Constantinople and the East

The Roman Empire continued with its capital at Constantinople, and is known as the Byzantine Empire.

c. 330 - 1453 C.E.

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Mosaics and Microcosm: the Monasteries of Hosios Loukas, Nea Moni, and Daphni
Mosaics and Microcosm: the Monasteries of Hosios Loukas, Nea Moni, and Daphni

These glittering mosaics offered Byzantine worshippers a vision of God in the heavens, sacred history, and the saints.

Innovative architecture in the age of Justinian
Innovative architecture in the age of Justinian

The reign of emperor Justinian (527 - 565) saw dramatic new developments in Byzantine architecture.

Early Byzantine architecture after Constantine
Early Byzantine architecture after Constantine

Basilicas and new architectural forms appeared following the reign of emperor Constantine.

The origins of Byzantine architecture
The origins of Byzantine architecture

House churches, catacombs, basilicas - explore the origins of Byzantine architecture

Church of St. Nicholas, Balinesti
Church of St. Nicholas, Balinesti

A church painted inside and out, at the crossroads of the (Eastern) late Byzantine and the (Western) late Medieval worlds.

Byzantine Mosaic of a Personification, Ktisis
Byzantine Mosaic of a Personification, Ktisis

This Byzantine mosaic shows the personification of the act of generous giving — Ktisis

Woman with Scroll
Woman with Scroll

An Early Byzantine sculpture of a woman with a scroll at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Byzantine Griffin Panel
Byzantine Griffin Panel

A panel with a Griffin (a lion and an eagle — the king of birds and the king of animals — combined).

A  chalice from the Attarouthi Treasure
A chalice from the Attarouthi Treasure

A sumptuous silver and gold chalice starring a youthful Christ, a saint slaying a dragon (could it be George?), and more.

<em>The Emperor Triumphant (Barberini Ivory)</em>
The Emperor Triumphant (Barberini Ivory)

This energetic image of military victory captures a moment of transition between classical and Byzantine art.

<em>Deësis (Christ with the Virgin Mary and John the Baptist)</em>, Hagia Sophia, Istanbul
Deësis (Christ with the Virgin Mary and John the Baptist), Hagia Sophia, Istanbul

When the most important church in the East became a mosque, this mosaic was covered but three faces survived.

<em>Theotokos mosaic</em>, Hagia Sophia, Istanbul
Theotokos mosaic, Hagia Sophia, Istanbul

The size and solidity of this Virgin and Christ reaffirmed the power of images in the wake of Byzantine iconoclasm.

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