Browse content

We're adding new content all the time!

Tlingit sovereignty and the Proud Raven (“Lincoln”) Pole
Tlingit sovereignty and the Proud Raven (“Lincoln”) Pole

A totem pole records Tlingit claims to land in southeastern Alaska by acknowledging the first sighting of a white man, who happens to be based on the likeness of Abraham Lincoln.

Reading a Haida clan crest totem pole
Reading a Haida clan crest totem pole

A 19th-century totem pole from Old Kasaan village of the Haida helps us to understand the meaning and function of clan crests.

The pueblo modernism of Ma Pe Wi
The pueblo modernism of Ma Pe Wi

A modernism emerges from tourism, boarding schools & indigenous traditions

Endangered coastlines and lifeways
Endangered coastlines and lifeways

A Shinnecock artist's view

Teaching guide<br>Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, <em>State Names</em>
Teaching guide
Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, State Names

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith's map of North American state names drawn from Indigenous languages focuses on stolen lands, making clear the influence of Native peoples on the continent.
APUSH: KC-8.2.II.B, KC-9.2.II.C
TEKS: 113.41.(13)(A)

Native Hosts
Native Hosts

Signs that guide historical understanding

From quills to beads: the bandolier bag
From quills to beads: the bandolier bag

The bandolier bag and the story of forced migration

Reading the United “States”
Reading the United “States”

Native American artist Jaune Quick-To-See Smith offers a history to inform our present

Geography, chronology and Native American art
Geography, chronology and Native American art

“Native American” is a broad term encompassing many diverse groups.

Lakota life on a beaded suitcase
Lakota life on a beaded suitcase

This one-of-a-kind suitcase tells the surprising story of an artist, a wedding, and a people.

Wearing a force of nature
Wearing a force of nature

The Yup’ik peoples, in one of the world’s coldest climates, made these ceremonial masks during the long winters.

Trade myths and native land
Trade myths and native land

Smith created this in 1992, responding to the 500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’s arrival in North America.