A-Level: Identity – the Divine




Water-Moon Avalokiteśvara, first half of the 14th century, ink and color on silk, image 114.5 x 55.6 cm (The Metropolitan Museum of Art)
This exquisite example of a Goryeo Buddhist painting depicts the bodhisattva on his mountain-island abode.

Water-Moon Avalokiteśvara




izō Bosatsu, late 12th to mid-13th century, Kamakura period, Japan, wood with lacquer, gold leaf, cutout gold foil decoration, and color, 181.6 x 72.4 x 57.4 cm (The Metropolitan Museum of Art)
This boyish bodhisattva reminds us that through humble bearing, we can spiritually blossom—like a lotus flower.

Jizō Bosatsu




This vessel represents the goggle-eyed deity associated with rain and crops, critical for the agricultural Aztecs.

Tlaloc vessel




North Wind mask
The Yup’ik peoples, in one of the world’s coldest climates, made these ceremonial masks during the long winters.

North Wind Mask








Artemision Zeus or Poseidon, oblique view, c. 460 B.C.E.
This bronze god sank to the bottom of the sea where he sat for millennia, but who is he and what can he tell us?

Artemision Zeus or Poseidon





The Harrowing of Hell, c. 1440-70, carved painted and gilt alabaster, 58.3 x 31.5 cm (Victoria and Albert Museum)
Straight from the monster’s mouth! Christ leads the way as Adam and Eve escape the jaws of Hell.

The Harrowing of Hell


Andrea Mantegna, Dead Christ, tempera on canvas, c. 1480 - 1500 (Pinacoteca di Brera, Milan) - detail
Mantegna was fascinated by perspective. His radical foreshortening and realism focus attention on Christ’s wounds.

Andrea Mantegna, Dead Christ