c. 800 – 31 B.C.E.



Artemision Zeus or Poseidon, oblique view, c. 460 B.C.E.
This bronze god sank to the bottom of the sea where he sat for millennia, but who is he and what can he tell us?

Artemision Zeus or Poseidon


“Stay and mourn at the monument of dead Kroisos, who raging Ares slew as he fought in the front ranks.”

Anavysos Kouros


Frieze detail, Dipylon Amphora, c. 755-750 B.C.E.
As tall as a person, this pot is covered with geometric patterns and early figural representations.

Dipylon Amphora



Iktinos and Kallikrates (sculptural program directed by Phidias), Parthenon, Athens, 447 - 432 B.C.E.
Learn about the great temple of Athena, patron of Athens, and the building’s troubled history.

The Parthenon, Athens


Kritios Boy (detail)
Following war with the Persians, this highly naturalistic sculpture was buried out of respect.

Kritios Boy


Grave stele of Hegeso, c. 410 B.C.E., marble and paint, from the Dipylon Cemetary, Athens, 5' 2" (National Archaeological Museum, Athens)
See the mastery of form developed in the Classical period translated to private art on this solemn gravestone.

Grave stele of Hegeso


Charioteer of Delphi (detail)
Take part in the celebration of an athlete’s victory—this life-size bronze is a hinge between the Archaic and Classical.

Charioteer of Delphi





Barberini Faun (detail)
Part man, part goat, this companion of the god of wine relaxes after a night of drinking.

Barberini Faun





The Pergamon Altar (detail)
Greek gods battle Giants for supremacy of the universe, so deeply carved that they almost step out into our world.

The Pergamon Altar





Dying Gaul, ancient Roman marble copy of a lost bronze Greek sculpture, c. 220 B.C.E., Hellenistic Period (Capitoline Museum)
Pain is visible on the face of this dying warrior. Did the ancient Greeks sympathize with their defeated enemies?

Dying Gaul and Ludovisi Gaul


Head and torso (detail), Statue A, from the sea off Riace, Italy, c. 460-450 B.C.E. (?), 198 cm high (Museo Archaeologico Nazionale Reggio Calabria) (photo: Luca Galli, CC BY 2.0)
Archaeologists pulled these bronze warriors from the sea in 1972, but their origin and date remain a mystery.

Riace Warriors


Euthymides, Three Revelers (Athenian red-figure amphora), c. 510 B.C.E., 24 inches high (Staatliche Antikensammlungen, Munich)
This pot depicts contrasting scenes: on one side a Trojan hero heads to war, and on the other tipsy revelers dance.

Euthymides, Three Revelers