Location: National Archaeological Museum


Hidden under volcanic ash for millennia, the beautiful frescoes in the houses of Akrotiri were recently unearthed.

Akrotiri, Thera


Modern artists fell in the love with these abstract 5000 year old sculptures—but what was their real meaning?

Male Harp Player from Keros


Artemision Zeus or Poseidon, oblique view, c. 460 B.C.E.
This bronze god sank to the bottom of the sea where he sat for millennia, but who is he and what can he tell us?

Artemision Zeus or Poseidon


“Stay and mourn at the monument of dead Kroisos, who raging Ares slew as he fought in the front ranks.”

Anavysos Kouros



Frieze detail, Dipylon Amphora, c. 755-750 B.C.E.
As tall as a person, this pot is covered with geometric patterns and early figural representations.

Dipylon Amphora


“I have gazed into the face of Agamemnon,” boasted the man who discovered it—but is it really the Homeric hero?

Mask of Agamemnon


Grave stele of Hegeso, c. 410 B.C.E., marble and paint, from the Dipylon Cemetary, Athens, 5' 2" (National Archaeological Museum, Athens)
See the mastery of form developed in the Classical period translated to private art on this solemn gravestone.

Grave stele of Hegeso