Postwar American art


Ruth Asawa, Untitled, c. 1958, iron wire, 219.7 × 81.3 × 81.3 cm Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art.
Taking cues from Mexican basket-weaving, Asawa creates diaphanous abstract forms from woven wire.

Ruth Asawa, Untitled











Viewer of Warhol's Disaster
By laying bare the relationship between commerce and art, Warhol nullified the idea of being a sell out.

The Case for Andy Warhol









Lee Krasner, Untitled, 1949, oil on composition board, 121.9 x 93.9 cm (MoMA) (photo: Matthew Mendoza, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)
Krasner severed the link between art and the everyday world, making important breakthroughs in abstraction.

Lee Krasner, Untitled




Robert Morris, Bodymotionspacesthings, 2009
Serious Art or a jungle gym? Morris shows us that art can be experienced bodily, and Minimalism can be fun.

Bodyspacemotionthings


Mark Rothko, No. 16 (Red, Brown, and Black), 1958. Oil on canvas, 8' 10 5/8" x 9' 9 1/4" (The Museum of Modern Art)
Rothko wanted his paintings hung as low as possible, so the viewer could enter the painting.

Mark Rothko (at MoMA)


What happens when a painting is vandalized? See how conservators at Tate leapt into action to save a painting.

Restoring Rothko