pottery


Euphronios, Sarpedon Krater
Gods carry away the dead on a pot looted from a tomb, trafficked out of Italy, bought by the Met, and finally returned.

Euphronios, Sarpedon Krater


This pot stood above a grave, and the female mourners depicted on it tear out their hair in grief.

Terracotta Krater





Eleusis Amphora
This ancient pot depicts not one, but two myths: Perseus slaying Medusa and Odysseus blinding the cyclops.

Eleusis Amphora




Niobid Painter, "Niobid Krater," Attic red-figure calyx-krater, c. 460-50 B.C.E., 54 x 56 cm (Musée du Louvre)
The gods Apollo and Artemis exact revenge for their mother, in an early attempt at showing depth in ancient Greek art.

Niobid Krater



Frieze detail, Dipylon Amphora, c. 755-750 B.C.E.
As tall as a person, this pot is covered with geometric patterns and early figural representations.

Dipylon Amphora


Exekias, Dionysos Kylix (detail)
This cup depicts the god of wine Dionysos escaping pirates by hiding and turning them into dolphins.

Exekias, Dionysos Kylix



Euthymides, Three Revelers (Athenian red-figure amphora), c. 510 B.C.E., 24 inches high (Staatliche Antikensammlungen, Munich)
This pot depicts contrasting scenes: on one side a Trojan hero heads to war, and on the other tipsy revelers dance.

Euthymides, Three Revelers