Seeing America – Periods: 1898-1945




















Aaron Douglas, Aspiration, 1936, oil on canvas, 152.4 x 152.4 cm (Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco)
Aaron Douglas's paintings at the 1936 Texas Centennial Exposition focused on how the rich African past inspired a bright future for African Americans, even in the midst of Jim Crow and the Great Depression.
APUSH: KC-7.2.I.B
TEKS: 113.41.(24)(B)

Teaching guide
Aaron Douglas, Aspiration




Horace Pippin, Mr. Prejudice, 1943. oil on canvas, 46 x 35.9 cm (Philadelphia Museum of Art)
Pippin fought bravely in World War I, but he and other African American soldiers did not receive a hero's welcome when they returned to the United States. Incorporating this history into his 1943 painting, Pippin places racism and segregation among the forces aligned against Allied victory in World War II.
APUSH: KC-7.2.II.C, KC-7.3.III.C.i
TEKS: 113.41.(7)(F)

Teaching guide
Horace Pippin, Mr. Prejudice


Norman Rockwell, Rosie the Riveter, 1943, oil on canvas, 52 x 40 inches (Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art)
Rockwell's painting of Rosie the Riveter captured the power felt by the unprecedented number of women in the workforce during World War II. But how accurately did it depict the experiences of the diverse women who contributed to the war effort?
APUSH: KC-7.3.III.C.i
TEKS: 113.41.(17)(A)

Teaching guide
Norman Rockwell, Rosie the Riveter