Gothic art in Germany, Italy, and the Czech Republic

The Gothic style spread across Europe, where artists produced sculpture, painting, and architecture for both Christian and Jewish patrons.

c. 1235–1500 C.E.

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Hiding the divine in a medieval Madonna: Shrine of the Virgin
Hiding the divine in a medieval Madonna: Shrine of the Virgin

The Virgin Mary is the portal to the divine in this Gothic shrine

The Crucifixion, c. 1200 (from Christus triumphans to Christus patiens)
The Crucifixion, c. 1200 (from Christus triumphans to Christus patiens)

A comparison of two Italian medieval crosses shows the transformation of Christ from transcendent to human.

Cimabue, <em>Virgin and Child Enthroned, and Prophets (Santa Trinità Maestà)</em>
Cimabue, Virgin and Child Enthroned, and Prophets (Santa Trinità Maestà)

Set against gleaming gold, Mary and Christ sit on an intricately carved throne studded with gems.

Venice’s San Marco, a mosaic of spiritual treasure
Venice’s San Marco, a mosaic of spiritual treasure

Nearly everything in medieval and Renaissance Venice was stolen or imported—and the Venetians advertised that on the facade of the Cathedral.

Altneushul, Prague
Altneushul, Prague

In the “Old New Synagogue,” desks surround a Torah plaform. Text outweighs image—only plants ornament the space.

Bonaventura Berlinghieri, <em>Saint Francis Altarpiece</em>
Bonaventura Berlinghieri, Saint Francis Altarpiece

At the center of this life-size painting stands humble St. Francis. Scenes from his life fill this gilded panel.

<em>Röttgen Pietà</em>
Röttgen Pietà

Taut skin, exposed ribs, a bleeding wound—this Christ suffered in both life and death. Medieval viewers took solace in his pain.

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